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Wengu zhixin Introduction

Table of content

Shijing ↓ Lunyu ↓ Daxue ↓ Zhongyong ↓ Sanzijing ↓ Yijing ↓ Daodejing ↓ Tangshi ↓ Sunzi ↓ 36ji ↓

Shijing

Shi Jing

The Book of Odes Introduction Table of content

Versions : Legge, Granet (305 pages)

Section I — Lessons from the states
1. P n The odes of Zhou and the South 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
2. l n The odes of Shao and the South 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
3. The odes of Bei 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44
4. The odes of Yong 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
5. The odes of Wei 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64
6. The odes of Wang 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74
7. G The odes of Zheng 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95
8. The odes of Qi 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106
9. Q The odes of Wei 107 108 109 110 111 112 113
10. The odes of Tang 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125
11. The odes of Qin 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135
12. The odes of Chen 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145
13. The odes of Kuai 146 147 148 149
14. The odes of Cao 150 151 152 153
15. The odes of Bin 154 155 156 157 158 159 160

Section II — p Minor odes of the kingdom
1. Decade of Lu Ming 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169
2. Decade of Baihua 170 171 172 173 174
3. } Decade of Tong Gong 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184
4. Decade of Qi Fu 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194
5. p Decade of Xiao Min 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204
6. _ s Decade of Bei Shan 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214
7. Decade of Sand Hu 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224
8. H h Decade of Du Ren Shi 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234

Section III — j Greater odes of the kingdom
1. Decade of Wen Wang 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244
2. Decade of Sheng Min 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254
3. Decade of Dang 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265

Section IV — | Odes of the temple and the Altar
1. P | M q Sacrificial odes of Zhou, decade of Qing Miao 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275
2. P | u Sacrificial odes of Zhou, decade of Chen Gong 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285
3. P | { p l Sacrificial odes of Zhou, decade of Min You Xiao Zi 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296
4. | | Praise-songs of Lu 297 298 299 300
5. | Sacrificial odes of Shang 301 302 303 304 305

 

Lunyu

Lun Yu

The Analects of Confucius Introduction Table of content

Versions : Legge, Lau, Couvreur (512 pages)

Section I —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Section II —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Section III —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Section IV —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Section V —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Section VI —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Section VII —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

Section VIII —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Section IX —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Section X —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Section XI —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Section XII —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Section XIII —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Section XIV —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

Section XV —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42

Section XVI —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Section XVII —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Section XVIII —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Section XIX —
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Section XX —
1 2 3

 

Daxue

The Great Learning Introduction Table of content

Versions : Legge, Baihua, Pauthier, Bog

Introductory

I — Confucius' text

II — Zengzi's First Commentary

III — Zengzi's Second Commentary

IV — Zengzi's Third Commentary

V — Zengzi's Fourth Commentary

VI — Zengzi's Fifth Commentary

VII — Zengzi's Sixth Commentary

VIII — Zengzi's Seventh Commentary

IX — Zengzi's Eighth Commentary

X — Zengzi's Ninth Commentary

XI — Zengzi's Tenth Commentary

 

Zhongyong

The Doctrine of the Mean Introduction Table of content

Versions : Legge, Baihua

I — "The sum of the whole work"

II — Only the superior man can follow the Mean; the mean man is always violating it.

III — The rarity, long existing in Confucius's time, of the practice of the Mean.

IV — How it was that few were able to practice the Mean.

V — "The Path of the Mean is untrodden"

VI — How Shun pursued the course of the Mean.

VII — Their contrary conduct shows men's ignorance of the course and nature of the Mean.

VIII — How Hûi held fast the course of the Mean.

IX — The difficulty of attaining to the course of the Mean.

X — On energy in its relation to the Mean.

XI — Only the sage man can come up to the requirements of the Mean.

XII — The course of the Mean reaches far and wide, but yet is secret.

XIII — The path of the Mean is not far to seek. Each man has the law of it in himself, and it is to be pursued with earnest sincerity.

XIV — How the superior man, in every varying situation, pursues the Mean, doing what is right, and finding his rule in himself.

XV — In the practice of the Mean there is an orderly advance from step to step.

XVI — An illustration, from the operation and influence of spiritual beings, of the way of the Mean.

XVII — The virtue of filial piety, exemplified in Shun as carried to the highest point, and rewarded by Heaven.

XVIII — On king Wan, king Wû and the duke of Châu.

XIX — The far-reaching filial piety of king Wû, and of the duke of Châu.

XX — On government: showing principally how it depends on the character of the officers administering it, and how that depends on the character of the sovereign himself.

XXI — The reciprocal connection of sincerity and intelligence.

XXII — The results of sincerity; and how the possessor of it forms a ternion with Heaven and Earth.

XXIII — The way of man;– the development of perfect sincerity in those not naturally possessed of it.

XXIV — That entire sincerity can foreknow.

XXV — How from sincerity comes self-completion, and the completion of others and of things.

XXVI — A parallel between the Sage possessed of entire sincerity, and Heaven and Earth, showing that the same qualities belong to them.

XXVII — The glorious path of the Sage; and how the superior man endeavors to attain to it.

XXVIII — An illustration of the sentence in the last chapter– "In a low situation he is not insubordinate."

XXIX — An illustration of the sentence in the twenty-seventh chapter– "When he occupies a high station he is not proud;" or rather, the Sage and his institutions seen in their effect and issue.

XXX — The eulogium of Confucius, as the beau-ideal of the perfectly sincere man, the Sage, making a ternion with Heaven and Earth.

XXXI — The eulogium on Confucius continued.

XXXII — The eulogium of Confucius concluded.

XXXIII — The commencement and the completion of a virtuous course.

 

Sanzijing

The Three-Character Classic Introduction Table of content

Versions : Giles, Deverge

I — The Basics

II — About Things and Numbers

III — About Classic Texts

IV — About History

V — About Illustrious figures

 

Yijing

Yi Jing

I Ching, the Book of Changes Introduction Table of content

64 Hexagrammes, Versions : Wilhelm

Ch'ien / The Creative 01

[ K'un / The Receptive 02

Chun / Difficulty at the Beginning 03

X Mêng / Youthful Folly 04

Hsü / Waiting (Nourishment) 05

^ Sung / Conflict 06

v Shih / The Army 07

Pi / Holding Together [Union] 08

p b Hsiao Ch'u / The Taming Power of the Small 09

i Lü / Treading [Conduct] 10

T'ai / Peace 11

_ P'i / Standstill [Stagnation] 12

P H T'ung Jên / Fellowship with Men 13

j Ta Yu / Possession in Great Measure 14

Ch'ien / Modesty 15

Yü / Enthusiasm 16

H Sui / Following 17

Ku / Work on What Has Been Spoiled [Decay] 18

{ Lin / Approach 19

[ Kuan / Contemplation (View) 20

Shih Ho / Biting Through 21

N Pi / Grace 22

Po / Splitting Apart 23

_ Fu / Return (The Turning Point) 24

L k Wu Wang / Innocence (The Unexpected) 25

j b Ta Ch'u / The Taming Power of the Great 26

[ I / Corners of the Mouth (Providing Nourishment) 27

j L Ta Kuo / Preponderance of the Great 28

K'an / The Abysmal (Water) 29

Li / The Clinging, Fire 30

w Hsien / Influence (Wooing) 31

Hêng / Duration 32

Q TUN / Retreat 33

j Ta Chuang / The Power of the Great 34

Chin / Progress 35

i Ming I / Darkening of the Light 36

a H Chia Jên / The Family [The Clan] 37

K'uei / Opposition 38

Chien / Obstruction 39

Hsieh / Deliverance 40

l Sun / Decrease 41

q I / Increase 42

[ Kuai / Break-through (Resoluteness) 43

l Kou / Coming to Meet 44

Ts'ui / Gathering Together [Massing] 45

Shêng / Pushing Upward 46

x K'un / Oppression (Exhaustion) 47

Ching / The Well 48

Ko / Revolution (Molting) 49

Ting / The Caldron 50

_ Chên / The Arousing (Shock, Thunder) 51

Kên / Keeping Still, Mountain 52

Chien / Development (Gradual Progress) 53

k f Kuei Mei / The Marrying Maiden 54

Fêng / Abundance [Fullness] 55

Lü / The Wanderer 56

S Sun / The Gentle (The Penetrating, Wind) 57

I Tui / The Joyous, Lake 58

A Huan / Dispersion [Dissolution] 59

` Chieh / Limitation 60

Chung Fu / Inner Truth 61

p L Hsiao Kuo / Preponderance of the Small 62

J Chi Chi / After Completion 63

Wei Chi / Before Completion 64

 

Daodejing

Dao De Jing

The Way and Its Power Introduction Table of content

Versions : Waley, Baihua, Lau, Julien, Wilhelm (81 pages)

Section I — The Way
1. The Way that can be told of is not an Unvarying Way.
2. Because every one recognizes beauty as beauty, ugliness exists.
3. Cease to set store by products that are hard to get...
4. The Way is like an empty vessel.
5. Heaven and Earth are ruthless.
6. The Valley Spirit never dies.
7. Heaven is eternal, the Earth everlasting.
8. The highest good is like that of water.
9. Stretch a bow to the very full...
10. Can you keep the unquiet physical-soul from straying ?
11. We put thirty spokes together and call it a wheel...
12. The fives colours confuse the eye...
13. Favour and disgrace goad as it were to madness...
14. Because the eye gazes but can catch no glimpse of it, it is called elusive.
15. Of old those that were the best officers of Court...
16. Push far enough towards the Void, Hold fast enough to Quietness...
17. Of the highest the people merely know that such a one exists...
18. It was when the Great Way declined that human kindness and morality arose.
19. Banish wisdom, discard knowledge...
20. Between wei and o what after all is the difference?
21. Such the scope of the All-pervading Power...
22. “To remain whole, be twisted!”
23. To be always talks is against nature.
24. 'He who stands on tip-toe, does not stand firm...
25. There was something formless yet complete...
26. As the heavy must be the foundation of the light...
27. Perfect activity leaves no track behind it...
28. “He who knows the males, yet cleaves to what is female”...
29. Those that would gain what is under heaven by tampering with it...
30. He who by Tao purposes to help a ruler of men...
31. Fine weapons are none the less ill-omened things.
32. Tao is eternal, but has no fame.
33. To understand others is to have knowledge...
34. Great Tao is like a boat that drifts...
35. He who holding the Great From goes about his work in the empire...
36. What is in the end to be shrunk must first be stretched...
37. Tao never does; yet through it all things are done.

Section II — The Power
38. The man of highest “power” does not reveal himself...
39. As for the things that from of old have understood the Whole...
40. In Tao the only motion is returning; the only useful quality, weakness.
41. When the man of highest capacities hears Tao...
42. Tao gave birth to the One...
43. What is of all things most yielding...
44. Fame or one's own self, which matters to one most?
45. What is most perfect seems to have something missing...
46. When there is Tao in the empire the galloping steeds are turned back...
47. Without leaving his door, he knows everything under heaven.
48. Learning consists in adding to one's stock day by day...
49. The Sage has no heart of his own...
50. He who aims at life achieves death.
51. Tao gave them birth...
52. That which was the beginning of all things under heaven...
53. He who has the least scrap of sense...
54. What Tao plants cannot be plucked, what Tao clasps, cannot slip.
55. The impunity of things fraught with the “power”...
56. Those who know do not speak; those who speak do not know.
57. “Kingdoms can only be governed if rules are kept”...
58. When the ruler looks repressed the people will be happy and satisfied.
59. You cannot rule men nor serve heaven unless you have laid up a store...
60. Ruling a large kingdom is indeed like cooking small fish.
61. A large kingdom must be like the low ground...
62. Tao in the Universe is like the south-west corner in the house.
63. It acts without action, finds flavour in what is flavourless...
64. “What stays still is easy to hold”...
65. Those who practiced Tao with success did not enlighten the people...
66. How did the great rivers and seas get their kingship?
67. Every one under heaven says that our Way is greatly like folly.
68. The best charioteers do not rush ahead...
69. “When you doubt your ability to meet the enemy's attack”...
70. My words are very easy to understand and very easy to put into practice...
71. “To know when one does not know is best”...
72. Never mind if the people are not intimidated by your authority.
73. He whose braveness lies in daring, slays.
74. The people are not frightened of death...
75. The people starve because those above them eat too much tax-grain.
76. When he is born, man is soft and weak; in death he becomes stiff and hard.
77. Heaven's way is like the bending of a bow.
78. Nothing under heaven is softer or more yielding than water...
79. To allay the main discontent...
80. Given a small country with few inhabitants...
81. True words are not fine-sounding; fine-sounding words are not true.

 

Tangshi

Tang Shi

300 Tang poems Introduction Table of content

Versions : Bynner, Hervey (320 pages)

Section I — j Five-character-ancient-verse
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

Section II — Folk-song-styled-verse
36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

Section III — C j Seven-character-ancient-verse
46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73

Section IV — Folk-song-styled-verse
74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89

Section V — Five-character-regular-verse
90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124